Pamela Hansford Johnson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Pamela Hansford Johnson.
This section contains 659 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Elizabeth Janeway

How long have unmarried British females in their thirties suffered from stifling family relationships and anemic love affairs? Is it only since World War I slaughtered thousands of potential husbands? Or does it go further back, to Victorian papas a là Mr. Barrett, and fiancés dead of fever on the North West Frontier?

Celia Baird, the heroine of Pamela Hansford Johnson's new novel [The Sea and the Wedding], is one of the most convincing, as she is one of the most pathetically repellent, of the whole genre. She has achieved, indeed, a semi-escape from it. That is, though she spends week-ends with Mummy and Daddy at a gruesome seaside hotel, she occupies a flat in London during the middle of the week, runs a typing bureau and has a lover. Yet it is only too evident, as she stalks through these pages of understated prose, jangling her...

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This section contains 659 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Elizabeth Janeway
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Gale
Critical Essay by Elizabeth Janeway from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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