John Updike | Critical Review by Julian Barnes

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 1,324 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by Julian Barnes

SOURCE: “Grand Illusion,” in New York Times Book Review, January 28, 1996, p. 9.

In the following review, Barnes offers a positive assessment of In the Beauty of the Lilies.

Domestic and epic, intimiste and magisterial, In the Beauty of the Lilies begins with a sly misdirection. D. W. Griffith is filming “The Call to Arms” on the grounds of a mock-medieval castle in Paterson, N.J., in the spring of 1910. Mary Pickford, short of sleep and over-costumed for a hot day, faints. This scene takes two pages. But Griffith, Pickford and the Biograph Company never reappear in the novel, they are images raised to be wiped. Instead, cut to:

“At the moment when Mary Pickford fainted, the Rev. Clarence Arthur Wilmot, down in the rectory of the Fourth Presbyterian Church at the...

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This section contains 1,324 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Julian Barnes
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