John Updike | Critical Review by Anthony Quinn

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 738 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by Anthony Quinn

SOURCE: “Fifty-five and Fading,” in New Statesman & Society, October 26, 1990, p. 33.

In the following review, Quinn offers praise for Rabbit at Rest.

The past 30 years of American life have been pretty crowded by any standards, and will presumably continue to disgorge their historians, their scourges and their apologists. There will be many a baggy social chronicle to pin it all down, though few will match either the intimacy or the eloquence of John Updike's Rabbit sequence.

Centring on the fortunes and foibles of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, middle American anti-hero and everyman, each novel put the seal on a decade's end—the fifties in Rabbit, Run (1960), the sixties in Rabbit Redux (1971) and the seventies in Rabbit Is Rich (1981). In those rollicking, rueful comedies, Updike's talents were in overdrive, both as master of...

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This section contains 738 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Anthony Quinn
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