John Updike | Critical Review by George J. Searles

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 1,476 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by George J. Searles

SOURCE: “Angst Up to the End,” in New Leader, October 1–15, 1990, pp. 21–2.

In the following review, Searles offers a positive assessment of Rabbit at Rest.

For sheer output and versatility, few writers can touch John Updike. Since his 1958 debut he has given us a play, four children's books, five collections of poetry, another five of essays—and, of course, the 24 volumes of superior fiction that have established his reputation as a major American author.

Updike's latest novel [Rabbit at Rest] completes a tetralogy about ex-basketball star Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, sometimes described as the Harvard-educated author's proletarian alter ego. Each of the books portrays Harry at a different stage of his troubled, unfulfilled life. Rabbit, Run (1960) introduces the young Harry: adulterous, confused, adrift. In Rabbit Redux (1971) Harry is 10 years...

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This section contains 1,476 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by George J. Searles
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