John Updike | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 1,479 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by George J. Searles

SOURCE: “Angst Up to the End,” in New Leader, October 1–15, 1990, pp. 21–2.

In the following review, Searles offers a positive assessment of Rabbit at Rest.

For sheer output and versatility, few writers can touch John Updike. Since his 1958 debut he has given us a play, four children's books, five collections of poetry, another five of essays—and, of course, the 24 volumes of superior fiction that have established his reputation as a major American author.

Updike's latest novel [Rabbit at Rest] completes a tetralogy about ex-basketball star Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, sometimes described as the Harvard-educated author's proletarian alter ego. Each of the books portrays Harry at a different stage of his troubled, unfulfilled life. Rabbit, Run (1960) introduces the young Harry: adulterous, confused, adrift. In Rabbit Redux (1971) Harry is 10 years older and still floundering, caught up in the tumult of the '60s. In Rabbit Is Rich (1981) Harry has inherited a...

(read more)

This section contains 1,479 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by George J. Searles
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Review by George J. Searles from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook