John Updike | Critical Review by Elizabeth Hardwick

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of John Updike.
This section contains 5,466 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Elizabeth Hardwick

Critical Review by Elizabeth Hardwick

SOURCE: “Citizen Updike,” in New York Review of Books, May 18, 1989, pp. 3–4, 6, 8.

In the following review, Hardwick provides an overview of Updike's fiction and thematic preoccupations, and praises Self-Consciousness.

John Updike, the dazzling author, appeared, and still appears, to be one of Augustine's “fair and fit”—and never more so than when viewed among his male literary colleagues who often tend to show the lump and bump of gene, bad habits, the spread and paste of a lifetime spent taking one's own dictation. For this tall, and one wants to say still young, man, despite certain dwindling-days, September-song modulations in the composition of his memoirs, Self-Consciousness, everything seemed to fall into place. An only child, treasured by nice intelligent parents who, if not particularly well-to-do, were prosperous in respect and plausibility...

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This section contains 5,466 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Elizabeth Hardwick
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