'Tis Pity She's a Whore | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of 'Tis Pity She's a Whore.
This section contains 7,366 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: '"Tis Pity She's a Whore: Representing the Incestuous Body," in Renaissance Bodies: The Human Figure in English Culture, c. 1540-1660, edited by Lucy Gent and Nigel Llewellyn, Reaktion Books, 1990, pp. 180-97.

In the following essay, Wiseman discusses Ford's treatment of the incestuous body in 'Tis Pity She's a Whore as a context from which modern readers can examine seventeenth-century cultural attitudes towards sex, incest, and the human body.

I

Soranzo.   Tell me his name!
Annabella.                      Alas, alas, there's all.
         Will you believe?
Soranzo.                  What?
Annabella.                     You shall
 never know.
Soranzo.   HOW!
Annabella.    Never; if you do, let me be
 cursed.
Soranzo.    Not know it strumpet! I'll rip up thy
 heart and find it there.
Annabella.               DO, do.

In this speech from Ford's mid-seventeenth-century play 'Tis Pity She's a Whore there are a number of gaps between what is presented on stage and what might be called...

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This section contains 7,366 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Susan J. Wiseman
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Susan J. Wiseman from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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