Duns Scotus | Critical Essay by David Burr

This literature criticism consists of approximately 41 pages of analysis & critique of Duns Scotus.
This section contains 12,261 words
(approx. 41 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Burr

SOURCE: Burr, David. “Scotus and Transubstantiation.” Medieval Studies 34 (1972): 336-60.

In the following essay, Burr studies the reasoning and conclusions of Scotus on the subject of the Transubstantiation of Christ, comparing his arguments with those of St. Thomas Aquinas and subsequent Scotist theologians.

John Duns Scotus remains somewhat of an enigma to the average student of intellectual history. Since the so-called “Thomistic synthesis” is usually accepted by the non-specialist as the quintessence of medieval religious thought, Scotus is relegated to a rather shadowy existence as the “other great medieval theologian,” without any clear notion of what was so great about him. His identification as the Subtle Doctor does little to ease doubts on this score, since some observers wonder if this subtlety may have been achieved at the cost of catholicity.

In no area...

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This section contains 12,261 words
(approx. 41 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Burr
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Critical Essay by David Burr from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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