John Donne | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 48 pages of analysis & critique of John Donne.
This section contains 14,317 words
(approx. 48 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Susannah B. Mintz

SOURCE: Mintz, Susannah B. “‘Forget the Hee and Shee’: Gender and Play in John Donne.” Modern Philology, no. 4 (May 2001): 577-603.

In the following essay, Mintz discusses gender ambiguity in Donne's poetry.

Donne's ambivalence about self-other relations is well known to readers of Songs and Sonets. Poised at the brink between leaving and lingering, Donne's speakers navigate the competing urgencies of intimacy and autonomy, what Roy Roussell has described as “the twin inevitabilities of distance and desire.”1 In fact, we can think of the dilemma as a quadrupled one, overdetermined by the paradox that staying behind with the beloved entails both the pleasure of contact and the risk of being consumed by that contact, while parting rewards the adventurer with independence but no guarantee of his lover's faithfulness. To strengthen a self made vulnerable by the conflictual demands of...

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This section contains 14,317 words
(approx. 48 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Susannah B. Mintz
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Critical Essay by Susannah B. Mintz from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.