John Donne | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of John Donne.
This section contains 5,004 words
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SOURCE: Gorton, L. M. “Philosophy and the City: Space in Donne.” John Donne Journal: Studies in the Age of Donne 18 (1999): 61-71.

In the following essay, Gorton discusses Donne’s sense of place, use of space, and spatial imagery in “The Sunne Rising,” “Breake of Day,” “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” “Goodfriday, 1613. Riding Westward,” and the Anniversaries.

John Donne was a Londoner born and bred, and his poems take much of their life from the life of that city.1 His lovers think of taxes, coins, and compasses. They know boys go to school, lawyers make money, ships come in; the business of life goes on outside their rooms. His most tender poems have that satirical edge—the awareness of an outside world that has no time for love...

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This section contains 5,004 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by L. M. Gorton
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