Ernst Jünger | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Ernst Jünger.
This section contains 2,258 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John K. Cooley

SOURCE: "The Adventures of Ernst Jünger," in Books Abroad, Vol. 32, No. 4, Autumn, 1958, pp. 365-68.

In the following essay, Cooley traces the place of adventure in Jünger's life and work.

Ernst Jünger's career as an author has been built around the search for adventure. With Germany, he found what he sought in war, and was finally appalled by the consequences. With her, too, he has struggled with the spirit of nihilism, both in the acute political form to which the German people fell prey between 1918 and 1945, and in the private realm of his own life. From his later books it appears that he feels both struggles to have been successful, at least temporarily.

Jünger may fairly be viewed as a more purely German writer of prose, just as Stefan George was a purely German poet, whereas Hesse and Rilke would be artists with a more...

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This section contains 2,258 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John K. Cooley
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Critical Essay by John K. Cooley from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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