Ernst Jünger | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Ernst Jünger.
This section contains 5,677 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ian Buruma

SOURCE: "The Anarch at Twilight," in The New York Review of Books, Vol. 40, June 24, 1993, pp. 27-30.

In the following review, Buruma traces Jünger's political and intellectual thought throughout his career and in his novels Aladdin's Problem and A Dangerous Encounter.

Ernst Jünger will be ninety-eight this year. He was smaller than I imagined. But he looks fit and still remarkably handsome. His head is crowned with thick, white hair, brushed forward, giving his rather hawkish face the sculpted air of a marble Roman senator. Jünger begins each day by jotting down his dreams. Then he takes a cold bath. He recently had a dream about Hitler.

He told me about it at his house in Wilflingen, a pretty Swabian village built around the Stauffenberg castle, which belongs to relatives of Count Claus Schenk von Stauffenberg, the man who tried to assassinate Hitler. Jünger's study...

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This section contains 5,677 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ian Buruma
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Critical Review by Ian Buruma from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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