Jim Harrison | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Jim Harrison.
This section contains 379 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Richard Deveson

SOURCE: “Call of the Wild,” in New Statesman, August 23, 1985, p. 28.

In the following excerpt, Deveson questions the hero-worshipping aspects contained in Sundog.

Here, in one week, are two novels each of which is an exercise in a very American kind of hero-worship involving swimming at night in the icy waters of Wisconsin and the northern Michigan wilderness. In Jim Harrison's Sundog the narrator, a professional writer, travels beyond the Straits of Mackinac to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to seek out a man who is not only eccentric and remarkable but is clearly needed by the self-disguised writer as a superman before whom to demean himself. The narrator has been challenged: ‘You might try writing about someone who actually does something.’

Well, Strang, the man of action, has preached at tent meetings, has built huge dams in the jungles of Africa and Latin America, has left wives and...

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This section contains 379 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Richard Deveson
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Critical Review by Richard Deveson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.