Quarantine (Jim Crace novel) | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Quarantine (Jim Crace novel).
This section contains 2,251 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Robert Irwin

SOURCE: Irwin, Robert. “Hiveward-Winging.” London Review of Books (3 July 1997): 21.

In the following review of Quarantine, Irwin commends Crace's literary skill and ingenuous imagination, but finds faults in the novel's self-contained and enigmatic significance.

‘I'll just explain the central situation. Six people are trapped in a lift between two floors of a skyscraper—a musician, a surgeon, a char-woman, a conjuror and his female assistant, and a hunchback carrying a small suitcase.’

‘Containing some sandwiches, I hope,’ chuckled the local curate. ‘They're bound to get hungry before long.’

‘You can fill in the details for yourself,’ said Froulish, not realising that the man imagined himself to be joking. ‘Where was I? Yes there are six in the lift. Part of the book consists of a series of flashbacks … over the previous life of each of them. Not their physical lives, just the psychic currents that flowed through them. It's...

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This section contains 2,251 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Robert Irwin
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Critical Review by Robert Irwin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.