Ruth Prawer Jhabvala | Critical Essay by V. S. Pritchett

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Ruth Prawer Jhabvala.
This section contains 849 words
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Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's stories have been compared to Chekhov's. She is a detached observer of what he called morbus fraudulentus, the comedy (in the sternest sense) of self-delusion which leaves us to make up our minds. Her novel A New Dominion embodies this irony, but one is more struck, this time, by the echoes of A Passage to India. Two generations have passed since Forster. The Westerner is not now in India to rule or give…. But, allowing for this difference, Forster's and Mrs Jhabvala's characters are matched. Raymond, the sensitive English aesthete and inquirer, is another Fielding, plus unconscious homosexuality; his Indian friend, the ingenuous and plaguing student Gopi, is a budding, ill-educated, up-to-date version of Dr Aziz. The disturbance in the mind of the unhappy Mrs Moore becomes bold and explicit in the persons of three English girls who have recklessly...

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This section contains 849 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by V. S. Pritchett
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by V. S. Pritchett from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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