Becket, or the Honor of God | Critical Essay by John H. Stroupe

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of Becket, or the Honor of God.
This section contains 1,947 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by John H. Stroupe

SOURCE: "Familial Imagery in Anouilh's Becket," in Romance Notes, Vol. XIX, No. 1, Fall, 1978, pp. 16-21.

In the folowing essay, Stroupe argues that a recurring pattern of references to fathers, sons, and brothers in Becket constitutes "one of the central methods by which Anouilh links the many aspects of the quarrel between church and state, between Becket and Henry."

Every one who is sure of his mind, or proud of his office, or anxious about his duty assumes a tragic mask. He deputes it to be himself and transfers to it almost all his vanity. While still alive and subject, like all existing things, to the undermining flux of his own substance, he has crystallized his soul into an idea, and more in pride than in sorrow he has offered up his life on the altar of the Muses...

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This section contains 1,947 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John H. Stroupe