Jane Hamilton | Critical Review by Molly McGrann

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Jane Hamilton.
This section contains 496 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by Molly McGrann

SOURCE: McGrann, Molly. Review of Disobedience, by Jane Hamilton. Times Literary Supplement, no. 5105 (2 February 2001): 23.

In the following review, McGrann explores the significance of the disconnect between past and present in the characters of Disobedience, observing that the novel's tension hinges on the relationship between mother and son.

Thirty-eight-year-old Beth Shaw (Eliza) is having an affair with a Ukrainian violinist, partly conducted through passionate daily e-mails [in Disobedience]. These are discovered by seventeen-year-old Henry Shaw when he accidentally opens his mother's file. “I was the boy in the family and therefore, statistically, the person most likely to seize upon the computer culture, the child to wire the household, tune it into our century.”

The Shaw family are mostly out of step with the twenty-first century: Beth's husband, Kevin, teaches history, and he and their daughter, Elvira, are...

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This section contains 496 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Molly McGrann