Romanticism | Kenneth McKenzie

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of Romanticism.
This section contains 3,986 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
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Kenneth McKenzie

SOURCE: "Romanticism in Italy," in Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Vol. LV, No. 1, March, 1940, pp. 27-35.

In the following essay, McKenzie recounts the origins and development of the Romantic movement in Italy.

Italy, for obvious reasons, always kept closer than other countries to ancient classical literature. There the classic spirit was native, for the Italians were always conscious of being the heirs of the ancient Roman Empire; there Humanism and the Renaissance arose; there the counter-Reformation resisted the Protestant spirit of the northern countries; there Arcadian academies and pseudo-classicism flourished. But the Romantic attitude was present in many Italian writers from the Middle Ages on. Petrarch was romantic in his introspective melancholy, Ariosto was romantic in his love of picturesque adventure; yet both are classic in the perfection of their style as well as in their knowledge of antiquity. Thus the two tendencies...

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This section contains 3,986 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Franco Ferrucci