A Pale View of Hills | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Jonathan Spence

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of A Pale View of Hills.
This section contains 276 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Jonathan Spence

A Pale View of Hills has caught the loss and uncertainty of modern Japan…. (p. 266)

[It] is a beautiful and dense novel, gliding from level to level of consciousness as it slips between the narrator Etsuko Sheringham's widowed life in the English countryside and her days as a young pregnant wife in the suburbs of Nagasaki, where she managed to find one important friend. The atomic bomb had fallen not long before, but, as the author drily observes, "Memory, I realise, can be an unreliable thing"; in A Pale View of Hills the memory of the bomb and what it did to a city is at one with the memory of Mrs Sheringham's daughter, Keiko, a suicide in a Manchester rooming house. Just as centrally to the novel, the memory of a little girl, beside...

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This section contains 276 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jonathan Spence