Eugène Ionesco | Critical Essay by John Lahr

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Eugène Ionesco.
This section contains 614 words
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SOURCE: "Eugène Ionesco," in The New Yorker, Vol. LXX, No. 8, April 11, 1994, p. 94.

[Lahr is an American critic, nonfiction writer, playwright, and novelist. In the following tribute, he surveys the themes and techniques of Ionesco's works.]

Eugène Ionesco, who died last week, was an entrepreneur of his own uncertainties. "There are no alternatives," he said about his first, short play, The Bald Soprano (1950). "If man is not tragic, he is ridiculous and painful, 'comic' in fact, and by revealing his absurdity one can achieve a sort of tragedy." Giddy with a sense of absence and of abdication, Ionesco's plays sounded a new note of frivolity at the beginning of the fifties which tweaked both the committed ideologues of the left and the boulevardiers of the right, and pushed theatre beyond the boundaries of logic and sociology. His plays often spoke...

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This section contains 614 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Eugne Ionesco
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Literature Criticism Series
Eugène Ionesco from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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