I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 14 pages of analysis & critique of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.
This section contains 3,911 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Opal Moore

SOURCE: Moore, Opal. “Learning to Live: When the Bird Breaks from the Cage.” In Censored Books: Critical Viewpoints, edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, and John M. Kean, pp. 306–16. Metuchen, N.J.: The Scarecrow Press, 1993.

In the following essay, Moore addresses several of the major criticisms against I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, including the charge that the story is too honest and brutal for young audiences.

I bring the dreaded disease. I encourage their children to open their hearts to the “dark” side. To know the fear in them. To know the rage. To know the repression that has lopped off their brains—

—Toi Derricotte “From The Black Notebooks”

There is, it seems, a widespread movement afoot to assert the innocence of children even as we deny or sabotage that innocence. There is what appears to be a head-in-the-sand impulse to insist upon this innocence...

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This section contains 3,911 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Opal Moore
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Critical Essay by Opal Moore from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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