Their Eyes Were Watching God | Critical Essay by Worth Tuttle Hedden

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Their Eyes Were Watching God.
This section contains 562 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Wright

Critical Essay by Worth Tuttle Hedden

Though "Seraph on the Suwanee" is the love story of a daughter of Florida Crackers and of a scion of plantation owners, it is no peasant-marries-the prince tale. Arvay Henson, true Cracker in breeding, is above her caste in temperament; James Kenneth Meserve is plain Jim who speaks the dialect and who has turned his back on family, with its static living in the past, to become foreman in a west Florida turpentine camp. Neither is it a romance of the boy-meets-girl school. Beginning conventionally enough with a seduction (a last minute one when Arvay is in her wedding dress), it ends twenty-odd years later when the protagonists are about to be grandparents. In this denouement the divergent lines of Miss Hurston's astonishing, bewildering talent meet to give us a reconciliation scene between a middle-aged man and a...

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This section contains 562 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Wright