Ted Hughes | Critical Essay by John C. Witte

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Ted Hughes.
This section contains 2,299 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Wotan and Ted Hughes's Crow," in Twentieth Century Literature, Vol. 26, No. 1, Spring, 1980, pp. 38-44.

[In the following essay, Witte discusses the mythological influences on Hughes's Crow.]

Ted Hughes has collected in Crow what appear to be the fragments of apocalyptic experience. Everything in the world into which Crow survives seems about to explode, compelled by intolerable internal pressures. The most trivial event might be cause for astonishing cruelties. But unlike the brutal naturalism frequently explored in the earlier animal poems, in "Pike" and "Hawk Roosting," the violence in Crow has a martial character. The grass, even, "camps in its tussock / With its spears and banners." And Crow's are the warrior's trails: courage, cunning, the indomitable will to survive, and the sharpness of eye and talon. Battle, furthermore, provides metaphor for the two ideological conflicts dominating Crow's experience: first, Crow's aversion to the Christian...

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This section contains 2,299 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ted Hughes
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Literature Criticism Series
Ted Hughes from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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