Howard's End | Critical Essay by Paul Delany

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Howard's End.
This section contains 5,612 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paul Delany

Critical Essay by Paul Delany

SOURCE: Delany, Paul. “‘Islands of Money’: Rentier Culture in E. M. Forster's Howards End.English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 31, no. 3 (1988): 285-96.

In the following essay, Delany discusses Forster's “lifelong preoccupation” with the privileged lives of upper-class Britons as revealed in Howards End.

When he was eight years old E. M. Forster inherited eight thousand pounds from his great-aunt Marianne Thornton, who came from a well-to-do family of Victorian bankers. His widowed mother had about the same amount of capital, ensuring him a comfortable home, and a Public School and Cambridge education. The Longest Journey deals with the emotional consequences of this secure and sheltered upbringing; Howards End, though not directly autobiographical, examines Forster's economic origins. The novel's motto, “Only connect …” is usually read as a...

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This section contains 5,612 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paul Delany
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