Housekeeping | Critical Review by Judith Gies

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Housekeeping.
This section contains 296 words
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Critical Review by Judith Gies

SOURCE: Gies, Judith. Review of Housekeeping, by Marilynne Robinson. Saturday Review 8, no. 1 (January 1981): 66.

In the following review, Gies lauds Housekeeping as a “sensuous, funny, and mythic” novel.

This extraordinary first novel [Housekeeping] is populated by women and by ghosts. It is narrated by Ruth, who grew up with her younger sister Lucille near the shores of a “bitter, moon-pulled lake” under the care of a series of relatives. The circumstances of their childhood are at once familiar and unfamiliar, like a town seen at night from a moving train.

Conventional Lucille, religiously brushing her hair, struggles to be normal in the face of such mortifications as a peculiar aunt who sleeps on park benches and an adolescent sister whose appearance is “compromised by my ungainliness, my buzzard's hunch.”...

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This section contains 296 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Judith Gies