Honoré de Balzac | Critical Essay by Cathy Caruth

This literature criticism consists of approximately 39 pages of analysis & critique of Honoré de Balzac.
This section contains 11,430 words
(approx. 39 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cathy Caruth

SOURCE: Caruth, Cathy. “The Claims of the Dead: History, Haunted Property, and the Law.” Critical Inquiry 28, no. 2 (winter 2002): 419-41.

In the following essay, Caruth maintains that in Le Colonel Chabert, a novel about a ghostly claim to property, Balzac illustrates how the law, functioning as historical memory, recognizes and yet fails to understand those traumatized by history.

Balzac's novel, Colonel Chabert, first published in 1832, opens with a peculiar scene: a soldier who is known to have died in battle most improbably and unexpectedly returns to the office of a lawyer to reclaim his property. Disfigured and unrecognizable, the stranger insists that he is actually the famous colonel and asks the lawyer to help him to obtain a form of legal recognition that will restore to him his lawful identity, his property, and his wife. In this strange reincarnation of his own...

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This section contains 11,430 words
(approx. 39 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cathy Caruth
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