Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr..
This section contains 11,006 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by G. Edward White

SOURCE: "The Rise and Fall of Justice Holmes," in The University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 39, No. 1, Fall, 1971, pp. 51-77.

In the following essay, White follows Holmes's image in America, from his extreme popularity to the later disillusionment about his ideals widely adopted after his death.

Occasionally the American nation sees itself in the life of one of its citizens. Something about the experiences, background, attitudes, or accomplishments of an individual seems particularly evocative of American culture, or at least a vision thereof. Such a life was that of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. In addition to being a man of great popular appeal,1 Holmes has held considerable interest for the intellectual community. From the publication of Holmes's The Common Law in 1881 until the present day, legal scholars, philosophers, political scientists, historians, literary critics, and journalists2 have attempted to understand and articulate the qualities that have made Holmes, in...

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This section contains 11,006 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by G. Edward White
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Critical Essay by G. Edward White from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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