Edward Hirsch | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Edward Hirsch.
This section contains 155 words
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Hirsch comes to poetry as to a wind-up toy. He plays with it, turns it inside out, breaks and mends it, plays. Sometimes it ticks like Gertrude Stein…. Sometimes it spins on the axis of its own silliness…. [A] kind of slapstick abounds. When he can restrain himself, Hirsch is better. He prefers the expressionist portrait ("The Enigma: Rilke," or the sweet "Matisse") or a stew of dissolves and associations ("Cocks," "Reminiscence of Carousels and Civil War"). This poet has talent, but it is vitiated by a coy or dizzy self-indulgence: updated Dada. As a result, the poems [in For the Sleepwalkers] aren't memorable. But from scattered hints, from a colorful diction and a rhythmic surety, it may be predicted that he can—and will—write a more substantial book than this: one for the wide-awake.

J. D. McClatchy, in a review of "For the Sleepwalkers," in Poetry...

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This section contains 155 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by J. D. Mcclatchy
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Critical Essay by J. D. Mcclatchy from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.