Patricia Highsmith | Critical Review by Carol Ames

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Patricia Highsmith.
This section contains 208 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Carol Ames

Critical Review by Carol Ames

SOURCE: A review of Found in the Street, in Los Angeles Times Book Review, November 1, 1987, p. 4.

In the following review, Ames praises Found in the Street.

Found in the Street is a complex character study of New Yorkers brought together by chance. Elsie is a vivid, young waitress with the magnetism and energy to break into the modeling world. Ralph Linderman, an atheist with a dog named God, is the aging security guard who becomes obsessed with protecting Elsie's innocence. And Jack Sutherland is a wealthy, aspiring artist with a mostly happy family life. He has the fortune—or misfortune—to have his wallet returned by Linderman with all $263, as well as credit cards and photographs, still intact.

Written by a longtime American exile, this accomplished and engrossing novel captures the taste and texture of life in Manhattan. From the exhilaration of discovering a previously overlooked Greek take-out restaurant to the feel of jogging through the empty, early-morning streets, "You could never tell what might happen in New York!"

This 19th novel goes far beyond the bounds of the "mystery," a genre label that has stuck to Highsmith's work since her first, Strangers on a Train, in 1950. It is time she reached a wider audience.

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This section contains 208 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Carol Ames
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