Patricia Highsmith | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 40 pages of analysis & critique of Patricia Highsmith.
This section contains 11,762 words
(approx. 40 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kathleen Gregory Klein

SOURCE: "Patricia Highsmith." in And Then There Were Nine … More Women of Mystery, edited by Jane S. Bakerman, Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1985, pp. 170-97.

In the following essay, Klein provides a stylistic and thematic overview of Highsmith's works, concluding that the writer challenged the conventions of the mystery genre.

In her refusal to be limited by the conventional considerations of the genre, Patricia Highsmith is, quite simply, one of the best and most significant crime writers working today. Critic Blake Morrison notes that "[T]o call her a 'crime writer' sounds limiting, even patronising, since, like Chabrol, Highsmith is less interested in the mechanics of crime than in the psychology behind them;" while Brigid Brophy extends the praise, "as a novelist tout court she's excellent…. Highsmith and Simenon are alone in writing books which transcend the limits of the genre while staying strictly inside its rules...

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This section contains 11,762 words
(approx. 40 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kathleen Gregory Klein
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Critical Essay by Kathleen Gregory Klein from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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