Patricia Highsmith | Critical Review by Lorna Sage

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Patricia Highsmith.
This section contains 735 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Savage Swiss Army Knife," in The Observer Review, No. 10612, March 13, 1995, p. 19.

In the following review of Small g: A Summer Idyll, Sage discusses the plot of the work and examines Highsmith's characterization and depiction of sex.

Patricia Highsmith's (posthumous) new novel [Small g: A Summer Idyll] starts out in cool, utterly characteristic vein. A beautiful boy, a character we've hardly had a chance to meet, is murdered on page two by strangers who'll never be caught—not in any story she's responsible for. And, to add insult to injury, Lulu, a self-possessed performing dog ('a circus dog, from circus stock'), is introduced as a character in her own right, one who takes up more or less as much space as the humans, and has about as much inner life as most of them, too.

Highsmith once notoriously confessed that if she saw a...

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This section contains 735 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Lorna Sage
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Review by Lorna Sage from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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