Strangers on a Train | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Noel Dorman Mawr

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Strangers on a Train.
This section contains 2,905 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Noel Dorman Mawr

SOURCE: "From Villain to Vigilante," in Armchair Detective, Vol. 24, No. 1, Winter, 1991, pp. 34-8.

Mawr is an American educator and critic who has written works on Romantic poetry. In the following essay, she discusses the development of the character Tom Ripley in Highsmith's Ripley novels, stating that the series shows Ripley's "progression from a villain to a vigilante as the world becomes even too evil for his taste."

Have you ever wondered how the criminal mind works? Patricia Highsmith has. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, focused on the pathology of a central character; and her only series character, Ripley, is a professional criminal. Some writers might make the hero charming—a bumbling crook, or a swashbuckling villain—but not Highsmith. Ripley is a thief, a murderer; he even takes risks in...

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This section contains 2,905 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Noel Dorman Mawr