King Henry IV, Part I | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Ronald R. Macdonald

This literature criticism consists of approximately 34 pages of analysis & critique of King Henry IV, Part I.
This section contains 9,990 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Ronald R. Macdonald

SOURCE: “Uneasy Lies: Language and History in Shakespeare's Lancastrian Tetralogy,” in Henry the Fourth Parts I and II: Critical Essays, edited by David Bevington, Garland Publishing, 1986, 359-85.

In the following essay, originally published in 1984, Macdonald traces the development and use of language in Shakespeare's history plays, focusing on Henry IV, Parts I and II, and examines the linguistic conventions that sustain and govern the vision of kingship as portrayed in these plays.

There has always been uncertainty about what we call Shakespeare's “histories.” The genre (if it is a genre) seems inherently unstable under critical scrutiny, always threatening to become something else, to slide over into other generic modes about which there is firmer agreement, to become simply tragedy (Richard II) or comedy (1 Henry IV), or...

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This section contains 9,990 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ronald R. Macdonald