King Henry IV, Part I | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 59 pages of analysis & critique of King Henry IV, Part I.
This section contains 16,453 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barbara Everett

SOURCE: “The Fatness of Falstaff: Shakespeare and Character,” in Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 76, 1990, pp. 109-28.

In the following essay, Everett explores the origin and development of Falstaff's character in Shakespeare's history plays, with an emphasis on the political significance of his appearance in Henry IV.

One day early in the 1590s a clown came on to a London stage, holding a piece of string. At the end of the piece of string there was a dog. It’s hard not to think that some in this first audience, realizing what an extraordinary thing was happening, put down their oranges and concentrated.

The dog, possibly the first on the Elizabethan stage, I want to leave where it is for a moment. My main subject in this lecture isn’t Launce and his dog (for this is, of course, the first entry of the clown in The Two...

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This section contains 16,453 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barbara Everett
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Critical Essay by Barbara Everett from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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