William Shakespeare | M. M. Reese

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of William Shakespeare.
This section contains 2,653 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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M. M. Reese

SOURCE: "Henry IV," in The Cease of Majesty: A Study of Shakespeare's History Plays, Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd., 1961, pp. 286-316.

In the excerpt that follows, Reese offers a brief discussion on the character of Hotspur, maintaining that, despite Hotspur's admirable qualities and charm, the young knight dies having learned nothing.

.. . For a prince of chivalry, as Hal was determined to be, Hotspur offered a different kind of seduction. This was the man whom the King wanted his own son to resemble, calling him the theme of honour's tongue, in a grove the very straightest plant, Mars in swathling clothes, and much else in eulogistic vein. He even wished it could be proved that 'some night-tripping fairy' had exchanged the infants in their cradles: which only shows how little he understood either Hotspur or his son.

Hotspur is a conspicuous example of the non-political man...

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This section contains 2,653 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the M. M. Reese
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