William Shakespeare | Wayne A. Rebhorn

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of William Shakespeare.
This section contains 3,302 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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Wayne A. Rebhorn

SOURCE: "Bound to Rule," in The Emperor of Men's Minds: Literature and the Renaissance Discourse of Rhetoric, Cornell University Press, 1995, pp. 23-79.

In the following essay, Rebhorn compares the "rhetorical kingship" of King Henry IV, which relies more heavily on visual effects than on words to persuade, with Prince Hal's skillful use of rhetoric to reconcile with his father and, later as King Henry V, to rule his kingdom.

. . . Shakespeare['s] . . . enlarged view of rhetoric .. . goes beyond that of the rhetoricians to stress the enormously persuasive force of visual displays, for his Machiavellian kings and princes also know that silent spectacles can often accomplish as much as a torrent of words. Richard III, for instance, works on the lord mayor and citizens of London by appearing before them silently reading a prayerbook between two bishops (Richard III, 3.7). Even more striking is Henry IV's decision...

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This section contains 3,302 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Wayne A. Rebhorn
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