Havelok the Dane | Critical Essay by W. R. J. Barron

Ian Serraillier
This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Havelok the Dane.
This section contains 4,918 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by W. R. J. Barron

Critical Essay by W. R. J. Barron

SOURCE: "King Horn and Havelok the Dane," in English Medieval Romance, Longman, 1987, pp. 65-74.

In the following excerpt, Barron considers the relative popularity of King Horn and Havelok the Dane and contends that while the realism of Havelok has more appeal for today's readers, that was not necessarily true in the case of its original audience.

… In the earliest of the English romances, King Horn (c. 1225), history is so throughly absorbed into folklore that, though the period of the Viking raids provides the violent social context of the action, specific historical events and characters cannot be identified. The Anglo-Norman version, which predates it by half a century, seems independently derived from a common original, perhaps a folk-tale told by people of Norwegian descent in the west of England.3 As a boy, Horn is set adrift...

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This section contains 4,918 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by W. R. J. Barron
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