South of the Border, West of the Sun | Literature Criticism Critical Review by Phil Baker

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of South of the Border, West of the Sun.
This section contains 798 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Review by Phil Baker

SOURCE: “Old Sweet Songs,” in Times Literary Supplement, July 23, 1999, p. 21.

In the following review, Baker comments on the role of popular Western music in South of the Border, West of the Sun, focusing on the novel's motifs and use of simile.

Books like A Wild Sheep Chase, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World have established a distinctive image of Haruki Murakami as Japan's most contemporary writer, a man in love with all things Western, who writes slightly off-the-wall postmodern novels influenced by science fiction. South of the Border, West of the Sun should modify that picture considerably. Plainly and beautifully told, it is a sad love-story with a more traditionally Japanese feel to it, despite its immersion in Western popular culture. Just as the protagonist rediscovers his childhood sweetheart, so the author seems...

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This section contains 798 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Phil Baker
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