The Wind-up Bird Chronicle | Critical Review by Lindsley Cameron

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of The Wind-up Bird Chronicle.
This section contains 2,745 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Lindsley Cameron

Critical Review by Lindsley Cameron

SOURCE: A review of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, in Yale Review, Vol. 86, No. 1, 1998, pp. 167–74.

In the following excerpt, Cameron finds The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle to be ambitious in its scope and skillfully crafted in its style, but ultimately decides that the novel (“a bad good book”) is a failure.

The Far East brings out the best in some, the beast in others. Oddly, this observation holds true even for Far Easterners themselves. This season brings four fictional takes on East Asia, of widely varying merit: Yasunari Kawabata's The Dancing Girl of Izu and Other Stories, Haruki Murakami's The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha, and Simon Elegant's A Floating Life.

The Kawabata collection is, unsurprisingly, superior. The first Japanese to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, in 1968, Kawabata Yasunari (1899–1972) was among...

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This section contains 2,745 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Lindsley Cameron
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