Jim Harrison | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Jim Harrison.
This section contains 238 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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[A couple of years ago] Letters to Yesinin, a minor masterpiece, was hardly noticed; it was minor because its mood was so thoroughly bleak that probably it could appeal to only a minor segment of sensibility. But it was magnificently written, and I hope somehow it will still find its proper audience. Harrison's new book, Returning to Earth, seems not quite so successful—perhaps because it is more low-keyed—but still notable. It is a loose sequence of poems and aperçus in which the poet gradually moves away from despair toward a tentative, tenuous acceptance of the natural world, his own world of farm and woodland in northern Michigan. Still, the old pain is dominant—alcoholism, a blind eye, sexual disillusionment, the wrack of the land. "At nineteen I began to degenerate," he writes, meaning, among other things, that then he discovered the degeneration of the world...

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This section contains 238 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Hayden Carruth
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Critical Essay by Hayden Carruth from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.