Harold Pinter | Critical Essay by David Jays

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Harold Pinter.
This section contains 413 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Jays

Critical Essay by David Jays

SOURCE: Jays, David. “Face Off.” Sight and Sound 12, no. 10 (October 2002): 4-5.

In the following essay, Jays offers a brief overview of Pinter's screenplays.

“I'll tell you what I am,” snarls Dirk Bogarde. “I'm a gentleman's gentleman. And you're no bloody gentleman!” In his second screenplay The Servant (1963) Harold Pinter introduces an idiom that was to become wholly characteristic of his cinematic career. Pinter, with his startling verbal precision and interest in temporal fuzz, was a perfect match for director Joseph Losey, on the run from McCarthy's America into an oddly antediluvian Britain. And The Servant launched a cinematic body of work as distinctive as his writing for the stage.

Losey was fascinated by the theatricality of British class antagonism, and inspired Pinter to create wonderful meal scenes. Accident...

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This section contains 413 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Jays
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