Hamlet | Hamlet's Ear

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Hamlet.
This section contains 4,865 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
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Philippa Berry, King's College, Cambridge

An alienation from the hypocrisy of a courtly style or decorum in language afflicts Hamlet from his first appearance in the play. The courtly airs or 'songs', the 'words of so sweet breath', the 'music vows', with which he wooed Ophelia are no longer part of his idiom, although he will briefly redeploy them to disguise his true state of mind. In Act 1 scene 2, we meet a Hamlet whose abrupt retreat from social intercourse is not only signalled by his mourning dress, but is also articulated through an intensely satiric relationship to language. This scathing view of the world is articulated in all of Hamlet's language, in his soliloquies and monologues as well as in his dialogues with others; it finds its most effective form of expression, however, in his use of wordplay. Indeed, before the final tragic catastrophe Hamlet's role as malcontent...

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This section contains 4,865 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hamlet's Ear