Hamlet | Critical Essay by Ken Eisner

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Hamlet.
This section contains 618 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ken Eisner

SOURCE: Eisner, Ken. “Hamlet.Variety 383, no. 9 (23 July 2001): 20.

In the following review, Eisner describes Campbell Scott's 2001 film adaptation of Hamlet as “the most accessible … yet” and notes that Scott's pre-World War I setting suits Shakespeare's theme of decay.

In one of the most accessible versions of Hamlet yet committed to film, Campbell Scott's self-helmed Great Dane is more than ever a man for our time. Falling somewhere between Kenneth Branagh's fastidious grandeur and Ethan Hawke's slouchingly colloquial take on the troubled prince, the veteran thesp—who returns to the role after several legit runs—injects considerable humor and lots of edgy anger into his screen version, which runs a reasonable three hours. Fulsome text is most notably trimmed where oedipal angle is concerned, emphasizing instead the intensely erotic connection between Blair Brown's youngish Gertrude and...

(read more)

This section contains 618 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ken Eisner
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Ken Eisner from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook