A. B. Guthrie, Jr. | Critical Essay by Richard Bradford

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of A. B. Guthrie, Jr..
This section contains 320 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Richard Bradford

There is sentiment, there is indeed a bushel of corn, in "Arfive," and a sadness in seeing the wilderness harnessed and gentled. One scene, infinitely touching, seems to condense all that Guthrie has said about the West's final taming. On a solitary trout-fishing expedition, Collingsworth meets and shares a campfire with two aging buffalo hunters who remember the savage country of 50 years earlier. Unlettered, they know only the oral literature of Indian myth and legend, told by Blackfoot and Crow around a thousand campfires. They ask the schoolmaster for a story. Able to recall only the fairy tales he has told his own children, he relates "The Bremen Town Musicians," embarrassed by its childishness. The two ancients listen enchanted, deeply satisfied by the good tale well told. When it ends, they ponder it and set out the moral they have...

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This section contains 320 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Bradford
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