Thom Gunn | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Thom Gunn.
This section contains 3,444 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Hulse

SOURCE: "The Repossession of Innocence," in Quadrant, Vol. XXVII, No. 4, April, 1983, pp. 65-9.

In the following essay, Hulse explores the role of innocence in Gunn's verse.

That generation of poets that emerged in Britain during the 'fifties, from start to finish of that long decade—how easy it has been for us to pretend we saw them clearly, and how little excuse they have given us for the pretence! There is Larkin, stiffening as he reaches sixty, but still interesting in the little he publishes. There is Enright, refining his ironic line with unfailing if inadequate urbanity. There is Elizabeth Jennings, bland, featureless, still writing poems. And Donald Davie, surviving his changes with an air of wear and tear that is elderly and authoritative. And Silkin with his mythic vision, and Ted Hughes with his: Hughes, most pleasing of them all to the Academy, famously fabricating his unrelenting...

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This section contains 3,444 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Hulse
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Critical Essay by Michael Hulse from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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