Agnes Grey | Critical Essay by Elizabeth Langland

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Agnes Grey.
This section contains 6,930 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Elizabeth Langland

SOURCE: " Agnes Grey: 'all true histories contain instruction,"' in Anne Brontë: The Other One, Macmillan, 1989, pp. 96-117.

In the following essay, Langland characterizes Anges Grey as a novel of female development "that both draws from a tradition of other such novels and departs significantly from it."

Agnes Grey tells a story of female development. What makes it distinctive from previous novels by women with female protagonists is that Agnes more closely follows a male pattern of development. The classic starting point for the male Bildungsroman, or novel of development, is the protagonist's dissatisfaction with home and a corollary desire to gain experience in the larger world. While Agnes cannot simply take to the open road like a male hero, she nonetheless longs 'to see a little more of the world' (AG [Agnes Grey, Everyman's Library (London and Melbourne, Dent, 1958)] 4). She resists being...

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This section contains 6,930 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Elizabeth Langland
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Critical Essay by Elizabeth Langland from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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