Nadine Gordimer | Critical Essay by Leon Wieseltier

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of Nadine Gordimer.
This section contains 1,745 words
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SOURCE: "Afterword," in Salmagundi, No. 62, Winter, 1984, pp. 193-96.

Below, Wieseltier discusses the effects of apartheid on Gordimer's black and white characters in "Something Out There."

"Each torpid turn of the world has such disinherited children, / to whom no longer what's been, and not yet what's coming, belongs," Rilke wrote in 1922, in a castle. In 1930, in a prison, a similar inspiration about the inconclusiveness of the modern age came to Gramsci. "The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born," he wrote; and went on to add, in the manner of an intellectual, "in this interregnum a great variety of morbid symptoms appear." In 1981 Nadine Gordimer, whose work has married lyricism to criticism in a way that tempts you to talk of greatness, chose Gramsci's sentence for the epigraph of July's People, perhaps her most representative fiction...

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This section contains 1,745 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Leon Wieseltier
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Critical Essay by Leon Wieseltier from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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