Nadine Gordimer | Critical Essay by Thomas A. Gullason

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Nadine Gordimer.
This section contains 826 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Thomas A. Gullason

Critical Essay by Thomas A. Gullason

SOURCE: A review of Livingstone's Companions, in The Saturday Review, New York, Vol. LIV, No. 49, December 4, 1971, pp. 50, 52.

Gullason is an American editor and critic. In the following essay, he offers a laudatory review of Livingstone's Companions.

One of the most stirring voices out of South Africa is the distinguished novelist, short-story writer, and essayist Nadine Gordimer. Along with Alan Paton, Dan Jacobson, and others, she has helped to expose the tragic oppression in her native land.

Livingstone's Companions is Miss Gordimer's fifth short-story collection. It continues her history of commitment to the human condition, which began in 1949 with her first volume, Face to Face (published here in 1952, with additional stories, as The Soft Voice of the Serpent).

A goodly number of the pieces in Livingstone's Companions, including the title story, "Africa Emergent," "Open House," "Inkalamu's Place," "The Credibility...

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This section contains 826 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Thomas A. Gullason
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