Lord of the Flies | Critical Essay by Frank Kermode

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Lord of the Flies.
This section contains 495 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Frank Kermode

Critical Essay by Frank Kermode

The device [of shipwrecked boys surviving without adults] is interesting in itself; but rereading Lord of the Flies after the publication of two more major novels by its author should be able to keep it in perspective. It is interesting, certainly, that so evident a master should want to use it; Mr. Golding, who knows boys well enough to make their collapse into savagery perfectly plausible, has, strangely, a profound and tragic interest in what interests them. Among the half-dozen really potent boyhood myths there are two he dwells on; the old one, of an individual or group facing natural problems unaided by adults, and a newer one, of prehistoric fantasy—steaming swamps and megatheria and men primitive in language and techniques. The first makes for tragedy, the second for its explanation; enormously refined, they come together as an...

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This section contains 495 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Frank Kermode