William Golding | Critical Essay by James Acheson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of William Golding.
This section contains 776 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Acheson

Critical Essay by James Acheson

Although critics have acknowledged that the narrator of Free Fall, Samuel Mountjoy, must not be identified with Golding, they have failed to distinguish clearly between Mountjoy's purpose in writing his narrative and Golding's in writing his novel…. [Critics] have taken the wrong approach to Mountjoy's assumption that it is possible freely to relinquish one's freedom of will. It is only when we recognise that this assumption is not shared by Golding that novel and narrative appear in the proper perspective: the narrative as Mountjoy's confession cum self-justification, and the novel as Golding's parable of the abuse of freedom. (p. 73)

Rather than having lost his freedom, [Sammy] has abused it in behaving selfishly to Beatrice and in contributing, perhaps, to her mental breakdown. But because Mountjoy has acted not entirely on his own initiative, but instead, under the influence of...

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This section contains 776 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James Acheson
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