William Golding | Critical Essay by Jean E. Kennard

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of William Golding.
This section contains 3,794 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jean E. Kennard

Critical Essay by Jean E. Kennard

It is untrue that Golding's novels leave us without answers, as [some critics] suggest. Golding admits that he cannot subscribe to any particular religion, but insists that he is a fundamentally religious man…. [His] faith in a pattern that transcends man is not the only difference between Golding's position and that defined in the early work of Sartre and Camus, but it is the basic one…. [It] is this belief which underlies all other aspects of his philosophy and determines the techniques of his novels.

It is because "man hasn't seen this" that he is in trouble, according to Golding. Golding sees man as trapped in himself, "islanded," a condition he appears to believe comes inevitably with consciousness of self, with the loss of innocence…. All Golding's major characters—Sammy Mountjoy, Pincher Martin, Dean...

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This section contains 3,794 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jean E. Kennard
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